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Showing posts from 2016

The Physics of the Perfect Paper Airplane

The Physics of the Perfect Paper Airplane with Guinness World Record holder John Collins 1st Marin Science Seminar of 2017 on  Wednesday January 11th, 2017 Terra Linda High School, Room 207 320 Nova Albion, San Rafael 94903 Join Us & Learn!
http://www.marinscienceseminar.com/speakers/jcollins.html
Paper airplanes have become part of an important movement in the 21st century. It's called "making". Some people want to couch the movement as a rejection of television, video games, and mobile devices. That's upside down. Look at Makers. They don't reject anything. They consume all of that and then start using it for their own purposes. They are up to their elbows in the technology and loving it. Paper airplanes have the scientific method built in. They beg you to experiment. The hope of the world is in the hands of scientists. We need all of them we can get. We have no spare brains on the planet. Join us to learn about and experiment with the p…

Spring '17 Internship Applications Due 12/31: Science Journalism, Photography & Videography

Marin Teens! (HS and college age) Want a cool spring internship? Check out Marin Science Seminar internships. You can apply online. http://www.marinscienceseminar.com/interns.html

Marin Science Seminar Internships
Spring 2017 Internship dates: Jan. 10 - Apr. 13
Deadline to receive online app: December 31, 2016 
Apply Online
Explore science and technology, meet scientists and medical professionals, gain experience for your resume and college applications, develop a portfolio! 


Meet the Marin Science Seminar from Marin Science Seminar on Vimeo.

MSS interns attend and assist with a  6 science seminars per semester, during which they meet the speakers and assist with various logistical duties. Sessions take place on Wednesday evenings at Terra Linda High School, Room 207, during the school year. Interns arrive evening of a session at 7 pm and are free to leave once breakdown is completed (between 8:30 and 9 pm). Interns also assist in researching and creating materials about event t…

"What Really Killed the Dinosaurs?" with Courtney Sprain of UC Berkeley's Dept. of Earth & Planetary Science

What Really Killed the Dinosaurs?  with Courtney Sprain of UC Berkeley's Dept. of Earth & Planetary Science Wednesday, November16, 2016
7:30 - 8:30 pm Terra Linda High School, Room 207
320 Nova Albion, San Rafael, CA 93903 Last Marin Science Seminar of 2016 http://www.marinscienceseminar.com/speakers/csprain.html
Ammonites, pterosaurs, plesiosaurs, and most famously, dinosaurs, are just a small percentage of the 75% of species that went extinct at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. What caused this mass extinction? Was it a giant meteor impact? Massive outpourings of lava and gas? Or something else all together? Join Ph.D. student, Courtney Sprain, as she walks you through the very Berkeley-centric history of the of the mass extinction at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary and how current UC-Berkeley scientists are employing new techniques to further understand what really killed the dinosaurs. 
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Courtney Sprain is a graduate student in the Depar…

An Interview with Dr. Tobias Marton - MSS Speaker 11/9/16

By Shoshana Harlem, Terra Linda High School

Did you know that each year about 20 million people in the United States get diagnosed with depression? Worldwide, more than 350 million people suffer from depression. Depression is a mental illness where a person's sadness lasts more than two weeks. Depression can lead to all sorts of problems including suicide. Dr. Tobias Marton, Assistant Professor at UCSF, studies and helps people who suffer from depression.

In advance of his talk at TLHS, he provided the following information:


1. What made you become interested in being a Psychiatrist and studying depression?

 I became interested in medicine and biology during my junior year of high school while taking AP biology and harboring a mild obsession with the hit TV show ER. Prior to then, I really hadn’t thought too much about becoming a scientist or doctor and was actually much more interested in history and music. The summer between my junior and senior year I was able to get an internship …

Invention in Medicine this Wed. 10/26/16

Marin Science Seminar for Teens & Community Presents Invention in Medicine How Medical Devices get Invented and Go to Market with Art Wallace MD PhD of UCSF & VAMC SF
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 7:30 - 8:30 pm Terra Linda High School, Room 207 320 Nova Albion, San Rafael, CA 94903 


Art Wallace started out in experimental surgery and radiology studying imaging of the heart using CT
scanners. He has worked on a number of devices that originally were built for experimental studies that evolved into clinically useful devices including a cardiac output monitor, the off pump CABG, off pump aneurysm surgery, electronic sedation, and a selective coronary vasodialtor. Dr. Wallace will explain his experiences with the inventive process using examples from both device design and drug development. There will be a brief discussion of the importance of intellectual property, patents, venture capital, FDA approval, and business development in completing the invention process. There will …

The Code of Life & the Justice System

presents
The Code of Life & the Justice System How DNA is used in Criminal & Humanitarian Investigations with Brian Harmon PhD of California Department of Justice 
Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016 7:30 - 8:30 pm Terra Linda High School 320 Nova Albion, San Rafael, California 94903 ROOM 207 

 Find out the truth as we take a trip into a forensic lab, and find out how analysis of crime scene DNA evidence works. We'll discuss how a DNA profile is generated, what information it provides, and how it is used to assist criminal and humanitarian investigations. We'll also discuss careers in Forensic Science and how interested students can prepare themselves for a career in Forensic Science. 
Brian Harmon has more than a decade of experience in forensic DNA analysis in his work for private labs, human rights projects and the government. He also provides training to forensic scientists from around the world. 
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Follow Marin Science Seminar on: Facebook - Instagram - Twi…

An Interview with Dr. Maggie Louie

By Zack Griggy, San Marin HS

           Cancer is a widespread problem. The American Cancer Society estimates that this year over 1.6 million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer and another half a million are expected to die from it. Dr. Maggie Louie is an experienced researcher in the fields of cancer. Currently, she runs an active cancer research center that studies breast cancer.

To find out more about Dr. Louie's work and her research, we conducted an interview:

1. How did you first become interested in studying cancer?

I did a medical internship the summer of my junior year in high school and I got to shadow two surgeons.  One of the surgeries that I observed was a 40-year cancer patient undergo double mastectomy.  At the age of 16, just thinking about how breast cancer can take away an organ that partly defines someone's women-hood had a significant effect on me.  At that moment, I became quite interested in cancer.

2. What studies have you conducted in the past? How ha…

Marin Science Seminar Internships Still Available

Marin Science Seminar still has two high school student internship spaces available. Interns must be able to attend science seminars on select Wednesday evenings at Terra Linda High School in San Rafael. Interns arrive at 7 pm to set up, assist with the seminar, and can leave when the seminar is cleaned up by 8:45 pm. Specialties are also available for students interested in writing, photography, videography, and social media.

Start your application online today at this link!
See the calendar here: http://www.marinscienceseminar.com/calendar.html

More information about MSS internships can be found on the website at this link:
http://www.marinscienceseminar.com/interns.html

 Join us and learn!



Myths of Astronomy Wed. 9/21 at Marin Science Seminar at Terra Linda HS

This Wednesday, September 21st  Marin Science Seminar will present "Myths of Astronomy" with Thomas Targett of Sonoma State University's Astronomy and Physics Department. We have extra credit forms at all sessions. There will be astro-swag and door prizes for student attendees. Join us and learn!

September 21: "Myths of Astronomy" with Thomas Targett PhD of Sonoma State University
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Much of what we think we know about space often comes from film and television, but Hollywood's job is more often to entertain than to educate. In this presentation, Prof. Thomas Targett of Sonoma State university will sort fact from fiction, taking a tour through the worlds of Star Trek, Star Wars, and much more.

Thomas Targett obtained his undergraduate and masters degrees from Cardiff University, in Wales U.K., with a
research focus on 21-cm emission from neutral hydrogen. He obtained his PhD from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in the …

Space Travel: How Does Outer Space Affect Your Body?

By Rachael Metzger, MSS Intern

          Have you ever wanted to become an astronaut? Travel to space? Have you dreamed about finding extraterrestrial life or communing with aliens? If your answer is yes, I can assure you that you’re not alone. Countless children dream of becoming astronauts, and many movies and TV shows have revolved around exploring space. The exploration of the unknown is a wonderful idea on paper, but it is a lot more complicated than jumping into a spaceship and traveling to Mars, even if we have the technology to do so. Space travel can take a huge toll on a human’s body if certain precautions are not taken; any error could result in death.
        The human body was not made to travel in space, nor has it had time to adapt to such an environment. When launched into space, some effects of that changed environment on the body take longer than others to be felt. Immediately one might experience nausea and/ or vomiting. This is caused by the sensitivity of the inner …

An Interview With Diara Spain, Ph.D

By Rachael Metzger, MSS Intern

Ocean acidification is an issue becoming apparent in the effects on both sea creatures and humans. Diara Spain, the Associate Professor of Biology at Dominican University, came to Marin Science Seminar to talk to us about her studies in marine invertebrates and the damage ocean acidification is causing them. 

To learn more about Diara Spain and what inspired her studies we conducted an interview:


1. How did you get interested in biology? Is there a time, event, 
or person in your life that inspired you to pursue the study? I've always been interested in biology, really science in general. I grew up in rural North Carolina and as a kid it was expected that you'd spend most of your free time outside playing with your friends and pets.  One thing that sparked my interest in marine organisms were the summer vacations at the undeveloped beaches in North Carolina. 
2. Why did you specifically decide to focus on functional morphology, locomotion in echinode…

Ocean Acidification: How the Ocean is Acidifying and Affecting the Organisms That Call it Home

By Zack Griggy, San Marin HS

             Pollution is a global problem. One way to find proof of this is to look to the seas. We all know that the oceans have suffered greatly from pollution, evidence of which can be seen almost anywhere, from areas suffering from oil spills to the huge cluster of garbage floating in the North Pacific Ocean. We also know that many aquatic species are dying and going extinct because of ocean pollution. However, oils spills and trash aren't the only causes. Another cause is ocean acidification, which is caused by air pollution.
             Ocean acidification begins with carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is an essential part of photosynthesis in plants. However, it is also a greenhouse gas, and carbon dioxide emissions have become a global problem. Carbon Dioxide is one of the main contributors to both global climate change and ocean acidification. Carbon dioxide is emitted in huge quantities around the world. Part of these emissions are absorbed by…

Insidious Air: Defogging Air Pollution and its Pernicious Effects

By Zack Griggy, San Marin HS

We all know that smoking is harmful to us, but what if the very air we breathe also contains toxic chemicals? The truth is the air we breathe contains numerous chemicals that have harmful effects on both humans and the environment. As a result, the issue of pollution has been a very important and significant problem. It has driven us to invest in green fuels, manufacture in more eco-friendly ways, and cut down on greenhouse gas emissions. However, the problem of air pollution still remains somewhat untouched. Although emissions have been significantly reduced from vehicles and manufacturing plants, the problem as a whole remains.  Air pollution is known to cause numerous issues for the environment and humans, but particulate matter and ozone pose more immediate threats to human health.
           Particulate matter consists of extremely small particles that are a result from burning and can have huge impacts on lung health. Particulate matter, if small enou…

Ocean Acidification and Exoskeletons

Marin Science Seminar for Teens and Community Presents
"Ocean Acidification and Exoskeletons" with Diara Spain PhD of Dominican University
Wednesday, March 9, 2016  7:30 - 8:30 pm Terra Linda High School, San Rafael
Come learn about ocean acidification and exoskeletons with Professor Diara Spain of Dominican University. Dr. Spain is Associate Professor of Biology at Dominican University, San Rafael. She earned her B.S. in Biology Education from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University and her Ph.D. in Biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Currently, her research focuses on the functional morphology and locomotion of invertebrates.


Ocean Acidification of Marine Invertebrates Teaser Trailer from Marin Science Seminar on Vimeo.

A teaser trailer for the presentation that will take place on March 9th, 2016 at Terra Linda High School, room 207. by MSS intern, Camden Pettijohn (Terra Linda High School)
Join us and Learn!

Don’t Take Your Breath Away: Lung Diseases and What Causes Them

By Rachael Metzger, MSS Intern

The lungs are one the most important organs in the human body, so keeping them healthy should be a priority. Unfortunately, lung disease a leading cause of death in the United States, kills roughly four million people every year. Serious lung diseases might seem unpreventable, but in actuality, most are indeed preventable. The most common cause of lung disease is smoking, with many deaths also resulting from secondhand smoke. When inhaled, tobacco smoke travels from the mouth through the upper airway and into the alveoli. As the smoke moves deeper into the body it is absorbed and particles are left behind in the airways. These particles contain carcinogens (cancer causing agents) and toxins, which put people at risk for disease when present in any part of the respiratory system.

Lung diseases resulting from smoking, such as lung cancer, are the leading causes of preventable deaths in the United States. This means that the extremely high numbers…

Fresh Air February!

Join us this February for two great talks on the importance of fresh air. Here is a teaser vid by Marin Science Seminar intern and Terra Linda High School sophomore, Camden Pettijohn. Join us and learn!


Fresh Air February from Marin Science Seminar on Vimeo.

F R E S H   A I R   F E B R U A R YGet the Flyer Here
10: "Sitting by a Cozy Fire – Wood burning, Air Quality & Your Health" with Eric Stevenson of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District
24: "What's Getting into Your Lungs?: The Effects of Smoke, Ozone, Allergens & More" with Mehrdad Arjomandi of UCSF and the VAMC SF