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Showing posts from 2017

Flooded by Science and Sea Water: China Camp Sea Level Rise

Local Science for Teens & Community this Wed. 11/8 at Marin Science Seminar:

Flooded by Science and Seawater:  King Tides and What they Can Tell us about Sea Level Rise at China Camp State Park
with Sarah Ferner of SF Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve - a program of NOAA and SFSU http://marinscienceseminar.com/speakers/sferner.html Wednesday, November 8th, 2017 7:30 - 8:30 pm Terra Linda High School, 320 Nova Albion, San Rafael - ROOM 207
The tidal marshes at China Camp State Park play a key role in helping scientists understand how marshes respond to sea level rise and how we can continue to protect them. In this talk, we will hear about what scientists have learned so far and how they are learning more through research right here in Marin. 
Sarah Ferner develops, leads, and teaches education programs for NOAA’s National Estuarine Research Reserve System in San Francisco Bay. As the Reserve’s first Education Coordinator, her job tasks are diverse - ranging from w…

"When Parasites Kill" - An Interview With Stephanie Rasmussen, M.S.

By Rachael Metzger, Marin Science Seminar Intern 
Stephanie Rasmussen holds aBachelor’s degree in Biochemistry and a Master’s degree in Biology from Dominican University of California and is coming to Marin Science Seminar Wednesday, October 18th, 2017 to speak about her research on malaria in Uganda.
Stephanie Rasmussen first became interested in biology as a high school student, but it was not until her freshman year of college that she learned what research was and thus realized her passion. Research sparked her fascination with lab work, which allowed her to test biological theories in a lab. Rasmussen decided to study biochemistry because she wanted to "have a deeper understanding of why different reactions happen inside cells to make them work correctly,” as well as to “help scientists, doctors, and other health professionals understand how and why different diseases make people sick.”
As a sophomore in college, Rasmussen worked in her graduate student advisor’s malaria la…

"Cyborgs! The Not-so-distant Future of Human-Machine Integration" Interview with Dr. Nuria Vendrell-Llopis

By Rachael Metzger - Marin Science Seminar Intern 
Dr. Nuria Vendrell-Llopis, a Postsdoctoral Fellow at UC Berkeley's Brain-Machine Interface Systems Laboratory with a Master in Telecommunications Engineering specializing in Electronics from the Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Spain, and a PhD in Biomedical Science, specializing in Cognitive and Molecular Neuroscience from KU Leuven, Belgium, spoke to Marin Science Seminar about her work with cyborgs.

How did you first become interested in Telecommunications Engineering and Biomedical Science?

“I was a kid when my brother got the first computer in the house and I was amazed by it. I wanted to understand how it worked. At that moment in time I thought computers were (or soon would be) way smarter than humans. With time I focused more of my attention in electronics and signal processing so I started my Telecommunications degree in college. Believe it or not, back then I hated anything that had to do with biology. Computers were …

Name that Bloodsucker! Interview with Eric Engh

by Shoshana Harlem, Terra Linda High School
Eric Engh, an insect ID Specialist, works for the Marin-Sonoma Mosquito Vector. He also runs educational programs for the Marin-Sonoma Mosquito Vector. He has a Bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies and an M.S. in Entomology from University of Florida.
1. What made you want to study insects? I have been interested in insects ever since I was a small child. I was also really lucky to have an excellent mentor- Ron Keith. He was our Vector Ecologist for Marin/Sonoma Mosquito and Vector Control District for over 30 years. Not only did he teach me much about entomology, he excelled at explaining information in a friendly and simple manner without making the listener(s) feel stupid. In the 5 years that I got to work with him, I got to see him help hundreds of people with their entomological inquiries.
2. What are the best parts of your job? What are the worst? I don’t really have any complaints about my job. I enjoy teaching about entomology, …

Cyborgs! This Wed. 10/4 at Marin Science Seminar

Cyborgs! This Wed. 10/4 at Marin Science Seminar we'll welcome Nuria Vendrell-Llopis from UC Berkeley's Brain-Machine Interface Systems Lab.
For the past two years, Dr. Nuria Vendrell-Llopis has been a Postsdoctoral Fellow at UC Berkeley's Brain-Machine Interface Systems Laboratory, on an EMBO Long-Term Fellowship. She holds a Master in Telecommunications Engineering specializing in Electronics from the Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Spain, and a PhD in Biomedical Science, specializing in Cognitive and Molecular Neuroscience from KU Leuven, Belgium.  http://www.marinscienceseminar.com/speakers/nvllopis.html Join us & Learn! 

Integrative Biology - An Interview with Richelle Tanner

By Rachael Metzger, Marin Science Seminar Intern

Richelle Tanner, a PhD Candidate in UC Berkeley's Department of Integrative Biology, is bringing her extensive knowledge of how climate change affects neural plasticity and growth within the Eelgrass Sea Hare to Marin Science Seminar on SEPTEMBER 27th, 2017. Details here.

Richelle Tanner's passion for the ocean and its inhabitants was sparked at a young age through growing up in the coastal city of Seattle and spending her summers in Honolulu. Tanner stated that since she was young she "always enjoyed reading books about seashells and learning about the diverse array of animals in coral reefs and tide pools." This youthful exploration prompted her to search for a career within the area of her passion, leading to her studies in Integrative Biology. "Being a scientist, especially a field biologist, is a career of constant exploration and discovery," she expresses, "this is why I became interested, and why…

Sea Hares, Cyborgs, Mosquitoes & More! Fall '17 Marin Science Seminar Calendar is here

Below and linked here (as a downloadable .pdf) is the Fall 2017 Marin Science Seminar schedule. Please share if you know other locals who would be interested. We have targeted extra credit forms available at all sessions for .
All sessions are free, geared towards teenage students (but open to all), and take place Wednesday evenings from 7:30 - 8:30 pm at Terra Linda High School (320 Nova Albion, San Rafael), Room 207.  Details can be found at http://www.marinscienceseminar.com/calendar.html Thank you.

SEPTEMBER

27: "Not Your Mother's Genes: How Maternal and Developmental Plasticity Shift Climate Change Responses in the Eelgrass Sea Hare" with Richelle Tanner of UC Berkeley

OCTOBER

4: "Cyborgs! The Not-so-distant Future of Human-Machine Integration" with Nuria Vendrell-Llopis of UC Berkeley's Brain-Machine Interface Systems Laboratory

11: "Name that Bloodsucker!" with Eric Engh of Marin-Sonoma Mosquito Vector

18: "When Parasites Kill:…

Videography Internships Available for Fall 2017

The Fall 2017 Marin Science Seminar (MSS) Internship Application Period is now open. We will accept applications for videography internships from July 27th until September 20th, 2017. The internship period will run from approximately September 22nd until November 29th.
Apply Online Here
Explore science and technology, meet amazing scientists and medical professionals, gain experience for your resume and college applications, develop a portfolio! Our past interns are now students at or graduates of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, CalTech, Chico State, Harvard, Humboldt State, MIT, Northwestern, Scripps College, Seattle University, Sonoma State, UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC Irvine, UC Santa Barbara, and UC Santa Cruz.

Marin Science Seminar interns attend and assist with a minimum of 6 science seminars per academic year (there are 12 per year) during which they meet the speakers and assist with various logistical duties. Sessions take place on Wednesday evenings at Terra Linda High School in San R…

Mathematical Models Help Tell the Future of Animals That Are Living in the Ocean

by Shoshana Harlem, Terra Linda High School http://www.marinscienceseminar.com/speakers/aceja.html
Scientists, including graduate students, researchers, and post-docs in the life sciences and mathematics, often use mathematical models. A mathematical model is a complex model that represents relationships in mathematical form that is used to study the behavior of a certain organism to make reasonable conclusions. Mathematical models can solve problems relating to biology and many other fields.

To learn more about how scientists use math to predict the future of crabs and other animals, come to the Marin Science Seminar in room 207 on Wednesday, March 29, 2017. Alma Yesenia Ceja of the Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies and SFSU will be speaking. Join us and learn!
Sources: 1. sciencefairwater.com/physical-water-quality-parameters/water-temperature/water-temperature-effects-on-fish-and-aquatic-life/ 2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4674973/ 3.http://www.sciencedi…

Interview with Marine Biologist/Veterinarian Claire Simeone of Marine Mammal Center

by Kavi Dolasia, Tamalpais High School

Claire Simeone, DVM is a Conservation Medicine Veterinarian at The Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, California, as well as National Marine Fisheries Service in Washington, DC. In addition to taking care of sick marine mammals that come for treatment at the rehabilitation center, she also travels nationally to respond to Unusual Mortality Events, develops international training programs, and works on the Marine Mammal Health Map, which provides a centralized reporting system for marine mammal health data.

To learn more about her profession, we interviewed her.

1. How did you first get involved in marine biology and the field of veterinary? I knew I loved both animals and science from an early age. Biology was one of my favorite subjects in high school, and I decided to study neurobiology in college. I started as a volunteer at a veterinary clinic in high school, and continued to work as a veterinary technician through college and veterinary schoo…

Interview with Chemical Engineer Eric Stevenson of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District

by Shoshana Harlem, Terra Linda High School

Eric Stevenson is a chemical engineer who works with the Bay Area Air Quality Management District. He helps figure out air quality issues such as how to reduce greenhouse gases. To find out more about his work, we interviewed him.




1. How did you first become interested in being a chemical engineer in the environmental field?

I was always interested in the environment, even as a child.  As I progressed through school, I had an aptitude for math and chemistry, so chemical engineering seemed the logic choice.
2. What air quality issues are you currently working on? 

Right now, we are working on a rule to reduce risk from air pollutants at facilities throughout the Bay Area to the lowest levels achievable.  In addition, we are also working on a way to regulate and reduce greenhouse gases, first from refineries and then from other high GHG emitting facilities. 
3. How do you think the new presidential administration will impact your organization?  Lucki…

The Intelligent Sea Lion

The Intelligent Sea Lion By Shoshana Harlem, Terra Linda High School www.marinscienceseminar.com/speakers/csimeone.html

Can an animal still be a good scientist without thumbs? The answer is yes, because the sea lion is in this exact situation. Although sea lions have no thumbs, they have a big brain. Their brain is about the same size as a chimpanzee brain. They are one of the few mammals besides dolphins, humans, elephants, and whales that have brains that weigh more than 1.51Lbs. Scientists are not sure why the sea lion has such a big brain, but they think that it might be because they have a large body size and those two usually correspond. Other theories have to do with the weightlessness of the marine environment, coping with cold water temperature, or perhaps it is just a random outcome of evolution. The sea lion’s brain consists of different regions for processing information from their whiskers. A specific, corresponding, area in the brainstem is devoted to each whisker on the se…

Paper Planes and World Record Breaking: An Interview with John Collins

by Zach Griggy, San Marin High School, Novato


Inside a hanger at McClellan Airfield, a crowd gathered to watch an attempt to break the World Record in paper aircraft distance. Following a throw, the airplane began to climb into the air. Halfway across the hanger, the paper aircraft stalled briefly, beginning a glide towards the concrete floor below. Approaching the ground, the plane pulled out and sailed across a white line. In those nine seconds, the World Record for Paper Aircraft Distance was broken.

John Collins, the maker of that record-breaking paper airplane, has been designing paper planes for years. He has written books and appeared on many television programs, including the Tonight Show with Conan O'Brien. On January 11th, 2017, John Collins gave a talk at Marin Science Seminar about aerodynamics and paper airplane design.

Following his talk, we interviewed Mr. Collins about his profession and his design process.

1. How did you first become interested in making and paper …