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January - March 2018 at Marin Science Seminar

Marin Science Seminar starts up again January 17th. Join us this semester for Wild Worms, Exoplanets, The Fountain of Youth and more. Join us and learn! :) 


17: "Wild Worms and Mineral Mosaics: A glimpse into hydrothermal vent communities" with Jennifer Runyan of the Lawrence Hall of Science

24: "Exoplanets" with Warren Wiscombe of NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center

31: "The Fountain of Youth: Is it a Myth?" with Chong He of the Buck Institute


28: "Gnashing, Gnawing, and Grinding: The Science of Teeth" with Tesla Monson of UC Berkeley


7: "The Marin Wildlife Picture Index Project" with Lisette Arellano of One Tam and Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy

28: "Name that Bloodsucker!" with Eric Engh of Marin-Sonoma Mosquito Vector

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