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Big Data and Medicine - Teaser video

Join us Wednesday, February 11th, 2015 at Terra Linda High School in San Rafael for 

Big Data and Medicine 

with Art Wallace MD PhD of UCSF & VAMSC SF

Dr. Wallace will discuss the use of big data in the scientific development of medical care.  He will describe how big data has changed epidemiology, quality improvement, and drug discovery using examples from the U.S. Veteran’s Administration.

Teaser video below by MSS Intern Ben Foehr of Terra Linda High School


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