Monday, March 30, 2009

NanoHigh: One Session Left

You may have noticed the NanoHigh flyer in the science classroom we have our seminars in. Nanohigh is a series of lectures given by UC Berkeley professors about nanotechnology. The last one, which I attended, discussed the use of carbon. I learned about why there are 2 forms of carbon, the use of nanotubes, the world's smallest motor, and graphene, the revolutionary material formed when you write with a pencil.

The next talk is about getting things from the lab to the market, and is on April 25, Stanley Hall, 10 AM. Registration is requested, click on the above link for the site

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

How we Know What we Know about the Brain


Marin Science Seminar Presentation: "How we Know What we Know about the Brain” (formerly “The Case of the Knocked-Out Neuron: Why brain neurons die and how we can save them”) Dr. Swanson will talk about how we have learned what we know about the brain and about his work's impact on Alzheimer's disease and stroke. He will also talk about how scientists work to figure out why neurons die and what can be done to keep them alive.

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Cartoon Physics - How Scientists and Artists make Pixar Films


with Rod Bogart of Pixar Studios

Pixar films are known for their characters and stories, but how is the film actually made? This talk will describe the various applications of math and science behind the art, from animation and
simulation, through shading and lighting, to mastering for the audience.

Wednesday, March 4, 2009

Can we mend a broken heart? Thinking about stem cell therapy with Harold Bernstein MD PhD


Dr. Bernstein is Professor of Pediatrics and a Senior Investigator of the Cardiovascular Research Institute at UCSF. He will talk about the field of stem cell therapy, specifically relating it to his work using stem cells to treat heart disease. Dr. Bernstein also practices Pediatric Cardiology at UCSF Childrens Hospital. He attended public school in New York, received his undergraduate degree from Harvard, his doctoral and medical training at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and his postgraduate training in pediatrics and cardiology at UCSF. Dr. Bernstein's research focuses on stem cell biology, muscle development, and heart regeneration. He has been recognized as an Established Investigator by the American Heart Association, and currently is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the American Heart Association, and the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (Proposition 71).